Exploring the world one word…and one mile…at a time

Wildlife

Reptilian Initiation in Sabino Canyon

Exploring Sabino Canyon and all its friendly inhabitants, capped off with tamales and beer to celebrate not getting bitten by a rattlesnake.

Exploring Sabino Canyon and all its friendly inhabitants back in November, a full day capped off with tamales and beer to celebrate not getting bitten by a rattlesnake. Snake photo from AZ Game and Fish Department website; we didn’t stick around long enough to take one of our own.

Everyone we’ve encountered in Tucson has mentioned Sabino Canyon as a “must go” destination. By everyone, I mean our realtor, bartenders, hair stylists, neighbors, coworkers and pretty much anyone else who learns we just moved here. So on our first plan-free Saturday in town, back in November while I was visiting for the weekend, we headed up to Sabino Canyon to check it out for ourselves. (more…)


A Change of Plans in Lake Louise

Lake Louise

L to R: Late afternoon on the shore of Lake Louise; nearby Moraine Lake; a washed-out section of the Banff Legacy Trail; the electrified bear fence surrounding the campground; and post-run yoga overlooking the Bow River.

After leaving Jasper via the Icefields Parkway, our first stop in Banff National Park was the small settlement of Lake Louise, most famous for its ski area and storied Fairmont hotel.  The hotel sits directly on the glacial lake, but the shore area and trails behind the hotel are open to the public.  We headed to the lake the evening we arrived in an attempt to avoid tour bus crowds, and we were rewarded with a parking space close to the water.  The lake was pretty, but the light wasn’t quite right, and the scene didn’t measure up to either of our expectations nor to other lakes we encountered.  Moraine Lake in Jasper and Maligne Lake, just a few miles away from Lake Louise at the end of a windy mountain road, were arguably more picturesque…at least on the days we visited them.

We spent the night at the HI hostel in Lake Louise, conveniently located near the center of town.  Actually, town is an overstatement.  It’s more like a small tourist village within the national park, with one main intersection, a gas station, a few inns, several overpriced restaurants, and a gazillion tour buses.  In short, nowhere we wanted to be.  We went to bed early, much to the chagrin of the 20-something German guys with whom we shared our 4-person bunkroom. (more…)


Jasper National Park (Put It On Your Bucket List)

Caption

Get your camera! (L to R): Random mountains at sunset and sunrise; scenic Lake Maligne; amazing scenery in every direction.

Greetings from Jasper National Park in Alberta, Canada…our first official national park of this trip! Jasper is the farthest northwest that we will venture this summer, and it is absolutely worth the 3,000+ miles we trekked across the continent to get here. Jasper is the largest of Canada’s Rocky Mountains parks, and it’s also less trafficked than Banff and Yoho to the south.  We try to avoid clichés and hyperbole here on WPG, but truth is, since we arrived in Jasper, there has been a stunning, mind-blowing, awe-inspiring, picturesque cliché around every corner.

We’ve been here for less than 24 hours, but it feels more like a week.  We’ve visited the Miette Hot Springs, sampled local brews, stayed overnight in a rustic wilderness hostel (no running water), ran four miles around town this morning (nearly running into an elk), and hiked a bit at Lake Maligne.  We are now back in town jumping on the grid for a few minutes before returning to the hostel (with a planned visit to Athabasca Falls on the way). (more…)


Home is Where The Car Is

Clockwise from bottom left: Front porch swing, gravel road leading to house, local swimming hole, morning yoga, and afternoon storm clouds

After our week-long stay in Maine and a weekend stop in Portsmouth for our friends’ wedding, we’ve made our way to a friend’s house in the mountains of central Virginia.  In a happy scheduling coincidence, our friend (who travels frequently) happens to be at the house for the first week of our planned three-week stay.  It’s been nice catching up with him over shared meals and late night card games, and it will be nice to find a rhythm of our own once he’s on the road again.  We arrived late Sunday night and have spent the week becoming familiar with the area and our new temporary home.  The house is set back about a mile down a gravel road, with few neighbors to encounter and many acres of woods to explore.  Each morning, I’ve taken my coffee outside and listened to the land come alive from my perch on the wooden swing. We’ve napped in hammocks and walked along winding paths.  We’ve witnessed deer grazing in the front yard, turkey vultures and coyotes scavenging along the main road, and countless birds and butterflies and bats and other things with wings.  We’ve also managed to keep our fitness routine somewhat intact, with some creative adjustments.  When the weather’s been nice, we’ve brought our workouts to the back yard, and when it was raining, I set up my yoga mat on the covered front porch.  We’ve explored sections of the Blue Ridge Parkway and hiked to a remote waterfall swimming hole.  Today, we ventured to the next county in search of a safe running route and ended up finding a converted rail trail that was perfect for today’s training run.  (We’re running a 10K here in Virginia on Saturday, and it’s been a little tough keeping up our mileage on the road.)  We’re now back at the house, enjoying a quiet afternoon and watching storm clouds roll in from the west.  I think it’s going to be a good night to hunker down on the mountain. -J


Island Hopping Through History

L to R: Early dock departure / Ft. Jefferson / Moat and outer wall / Arch architecture / Bird life / Does anyone look good in snorkeling gear?

Dry Tortugas National Park is both the southernmost park in the system and one of the hardest to reach.  Visiting the park has been on my bucket list for years, and we were fortunate enough to make it there on Monday (the fifth park of this trip!).  Located in the Gulf of Mexico 70 miles off Key West, the Dry Tortugas can only be reached by boat or sea plane.  We traveled there on the Yankee Freedom II, a two-level passenger ferry.  The first hour of the trip—out past the Marquesas—was relatively smooth sailing, but the second hour took us across a deep-water channel, so the seas were a little rough.  We arrived in one piece and were happy to be on land, if only temporarily.

The ferry boat docks at Garden Key, the largest island in the park and home to Ft. Jefferson, the largest masonry structure in the Western Hemisphere.  Millions of bricks from places as far away as Maine were used to construct the three-level fort during the 19th century.  Construction was never completed, but the fort has been used for a variety of purposes, including a military outpost and a prison, for much of the last 150 years.

The fort is impressive, but the view from atop it is stunning.  Surrounded by park waters in ten shades of blue, thousands of birds nest in the islands or make temporary stops as they fly between the Americas.  In addition to exploring the fort and the island, we hit the water with snorkel gear and explored a few underwater areas, including the fort’s moat wall and old pilings from a former coal dock.  (There are no services on the island, so for one all-inclusive ticket price, the ferry company provides breakfast, lunch, restrooms, and snorkeling equipment for day passengers.)

Satisfied with our adventure and just a little sunburned, we settled in for the trip back to Key West and arrived in time to watch the sunset.  More on that later!  In the meantime, take a peek at this video.  Consider it a sneak peek of your own trip someday!   -J


Some Drives Are Better Than Others

Skyline Drive traverses the Blue Ridge Mountains through Shenandoah National Park.  The north end of the drive begins in Front Royal, VA, a surprising town that appears to be maintaining itself quite well despite the economy.  The architecture in Front Royal is familiar, each building crafted of the same stones, bricks and shingles of eastern towns ranging from Plattsburgh, NY to New Castle, PA to Greenville, SC.  It is the architecture of hardware stores and insurance agencies, small public libraries and aging churches.  We agreed Front Royal would go on the list of potential places to live “someday.”

At the entrance to Skyline Drive, Howard, the friendly, nervous, red-headed (and bearded) ranger, sold us our $80 Interagency Annual Pass, allowing access to the many places we hope to visit across the country in the next twelve months.  Armed with our pass and some park literature, we hit the road.  Skyline Drive is 105 miles of winding, rising and falling road filled with wildlife, old growth forest and very few other people.  (Most park facilities don’t officially open for the season until later this spring.)  After getting distracted by a handful of deer, two overlooks and countless circling hawks, it had taken us nearly 20 minutes to go the first five miles.  It was looking like the drive would take longer than the three hours we had estimated.  (The maximum speed limit on the drive is 35 MPH.)  We were all smiles and in no hurry.  Today, the deer posed for pictures, but despite our vigilance, the bears were elusive.  Maybe we’ll be luckier in the Smokies…preferably from the car.

Today's Adventures (L to R): Wildlife-Scenery-North Entrance-The Appalachian Trail-Stony Man

At the halfway point of the drive, we parked and hit the trail for a short hike to the outlook on Stony Man Trail, recommended by the ranger as a brief but rewarding trip into the woods.  At 4,010 feet, it is the second highest point in the park, and part of the summit route overlaps the Appalachian Trail.  The trail was well-maintained, and we cruised to the top in 20 minutes.  Once there, we surveyed the valley and took in a recommendation from a local couple to visit the “Camp David of President Herbert Hoover,” also in the park.  We determined that this newly found part of America was worth a second visit and a much more thorough exploration of Shenandoah National Park.  Perhaps later this spring…

The second half of the drive went more quickly than the first.  At the end of the road, we opted to take the highway to Tennessee instead of the Blue Ridge Parkway.  Although the Parkway is on our “must do someday” list, it wasn’t on our “must do this trip” list.  We capped off our 415-mile day with a dip in the hotel pool and a tall draft beer.  My first time in Tennessee has been more relaxing than expected.  I’ll be enjoying the hotel bed tonight, since tomorrow night will bring the Great Smoky Mountains and our first campsite of the trip! –M

Here’s a look at what we saw from the summit of Stony Man: